When People Believe In Food

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Somehow there is both much and little to say about food in Taiwan. And that's a good thing. The much: bristling variety on any and every street, mom 'n pop shops, open-air storefronts, incomparable night markets (and prices!), cart food caravans cooked by character faces, delicacies that are still hand made. The little: simply convenient, quick. As many here would seem to ask, "Why wouldn't you eat out?"

I didn't want to slather your eyes with an unending stream of deliciousness (food porn just isn't my thing) so I've settled on really just a glimpse of some of our favorite eats. If you've questions about any of the items pictured above, just leave me a comment.

You should probably know that I'm a sucker for stories and sweets; a combo, should you offer, I would never refuse. So my favorite sweet story from the bunch rests on the last set of pictures from the clean and simple Myowa near the popular Yong Kang Street. The man behind Myowa is completely self taught. That satiny green tea ice cream, the multiple layer sheet cake, crispy crunchy feuille? He just read books.

He recalled favorite tastes, he practiced, he made all things matcha green tea. I've so much respect for learners that become doers.

I've even more respect for those who keep doing what they do well for years on end, straight and true. And there is, thankfully, much of that on these streets. When food tastes and speaks in that way, straight and true, I find myself smiling with an odd sense of comfort. People still believe in that, I tell myself.

This island may not be my home, but its food nudges its way effortlessly into my life. I'll always come back for more.